US Women Get Passed Over for Promotions

US Women Get Passed Over for Promotions

The latest report on women in the workplace from Lean In and McKinsey focuses on the challenges women still face when it comes to getting ahead in corporate America. Quartz’s Oliver Staley highlights the report’s key findings:

For every 100 women promoted past entry level positions, 130 men are promoted. Women are less likely to receive challenging assignments, participate in meetings and have access to senior leaders. And the pipeline of promotion shows women are being passed over at every stage (men and women are dropping out of the workplace at equal rates, so the numbers can’t be blamed on attrition) …

The survey revealed that more women then men asked for a raise, 29% to 27%, but that in response, 30% of women were told that they were being “bossy,” “aggressive,” or “intimidating,” compared to 23% of men. Women also say they receive less feedback from managers than men. While 46% of men say they receive difficult feedback, only 36% of women do. Managers say the biggest reason they fail to give women feedback is a fear of being mean or hurtful.

Qz
Qz

As previous studies have found, the Lean In report shows that women of color are particularly disadvantaged in the US workplace, Emily Peck points out at the Huffington Post:

Defined as black, Asian or Hispanic, women of color make up just 3 percent of executives in the C-suite at the 132 North American companies surveyed, which include JP Morgan Chase, Procter & Gamble, General Motors and Facebook. Yet, these women comprise 20 percent of the United States population. White women were also nowhere near parity in those high-level offices, but at 17 percent are doing much better by comparison. …

Women of color who responded to the survey, especially black women, tended to perceive their offices as less fair. Only 29 percent of black women said the best opportunities at their company go to the most deserving employees, compared to 47 percent of white women, 43 percent of Asian women and 41 percent of Hispanic women.