Google Adding Salary Information and Other Features to its Job Search Results

Google Adding Salary Information and Other Features to its Job Search Results

Google has released a series of updates to improve its Google for Jobs search offering in the US, the most notable of which is the addition of estimated salary range information using data from sites such as Glassdoor, Payscale, Paysa, and LinkedIn, based on job titles, location, and employer. Google for Jobs is also now available on tablets, after launching on desktop and mobile only, and job searchers are able to filter opportunities based on distance within 200 miles of a location, as well as apply for any jobs they find using the platform of their choice, when the listing appears on more than one. In addition, Google says users will soon be able to save job listings to view later and/or sync across their devices.

Google for Jobs launched for in late June, getting the search giant into the business of matching employers with prospective employees. The company said that it did not intend to compete with existing job boards, but rather serve as an aggregator of listings and establish itself as the first place someone would go to look for a job. To that end, according to Google, job listings from almost two-thirds of US employers have now appeared in search results since the service launched, and with this week’s improvements, their piece of the job-search pie is likely to grow, and Google for Jobs is still only available in the US.

The company has had a busy year in the job search space. Google launched the recruitment app Hire in July, and has also begun beta testing a cloud-based, AI-powered job discovery platform that supports over 100 languages. That product, called Cloud Job Discovery, is designed to help staffing agencies, job boards, career sites, and applicant-tracking systems link together to fill positions. Google says that the candidate-experience platform Jibe was able to use the service to increase high-quality job applicants for roles at Johnson & Johnson by 41 percent, as well as increase career-site clickthroughs by 45 percent.

Salesforce Releases its Online Learning Platform to Public

Salesforce Releases its Online Learning Platform to Public

Salesforce, the San Francisco cloud computing company known for its widely adopted customer relationship management software, is going public with its internal online learning platform. Conceived in 2014 and launched internally in 2016, the Trailhead program has allowed numerous employees at Salesforce to develop tangible digital skills and make stark career shifts. In a recent profile by Elizabeth Woyke at the MIT Technology Review, one employee shared how he moved from recruiting to engineering after getting certified in two programming languages through the self-guided, interactive platform:

[Greg] Wasowski’s chances of making such a transition seemed unlikely—until he began spending several hours a week (in the office and on nights and weekends) on Salesforce’s online learning platform, Trailhead. Within a year, he learned two programming languages, earned certification as a Salesforce application developer, and got a job configuring Salesforce software for customers.

The occasion for this profile was Salesforce’s announcement that it will soon release a version of the platform called myTrailhead, which will allow clients to customize it to train their own employees in the specific skills they need. Trailhead, which uses micro-learning, gamification, and a system of points and virtual badges to make its short, consumable training programs engaging and effective, already contains a range of tutorials geared toward Salesforce users, including on how to master, administer, and program for the Salesforce software itself.

In addition to allowing the tech giant’s own 26,000 employees to upskill for career shifts, the platform has also allowed them to get up to speed on technology changes after coming back from leave, thus mitigating the career risks of having a child or taking other extended career breaks due to family obligations or illness. Woyke also interviews a mother at Salesforce who used the system that way:

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Cybersecurity Regulations Are Coming. Is HR Ready?

Cybersecurity Regulations Are Coming. Is HR Ready?

As cybercrime targeting the valuable personal data organizations hold about their customers and employees becomes more common, HR can add value to and even lead efforts within organizations to strengthen cybersecurity and data protection, first because HR department handle a lot of private data and as such are common targets for cybercriminals, second because enhancing cybersecurity systems means recruiting valuable and often hard-to-find cybersecurity talent, and finally because effective cybersecurity depends on ensuring that employees adopt best practices regarding passwords, online communications, and the handling of sensitive digital materials.

Currently, cybersecurity is less about compliance and more about protecting against breaches, but laws around data security are moving in the direction that cybersecurity will become a compliance issue for many US employers, at least at the state level, in the years to come (European law is also evolving in this regard). New York State, for example, enacted a regulation earlier this year that will make it mandatory for banks, insurers and some other private companies to meet a set of minimum cybersecurity standards. At SHRM, Dinah Brin dives into how HR can help New York employers face this mandate starting next year:

Among other measures, the regulation requires each covered entity to establish a cybersecurity program to protect company data systems and private consumer information from hacking. Affected companies, also required to implement written cybersecurity policies, must be prepared to detect, respond to and report system breaches, and will have to conduct penetration testing and risk assessments. …

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Companies Have a Responsibility in Closing the Digital Talent Gap

Companies Have a Responsibility in Closing the Digital Talent Gap

Now that every company needs a digitally adept workforce, the race to attract, hire, and retain top talent in this field is as competitive as ever. Demand for tech talent was already outpacing supply, but the problem is getting worse as companies’ talent needs are converging. In our research at CEB, now Gartner, we found that 40 percent of all job postings by S&P 100 companies were for just 21 different roles, including many technical, digital, and data jobs. (CEB Recruiting Leadership Council members can read our full study on competing for critical talent with a market-driven sourcing strategy).

LinkedIn and Capgemini recently completed a study quantifying the severity of the digital talent gap and looking at where companies are missing the mark. They found that 70 percent of US companies say the digital talent gap is widening, while 29 percent of employees believe their skill set is currently redundant or will be soon and another 38 percent believe this will be the case for them in four to five years. These findings also highlight how much more companies need to be doing to train existing employees on the digital skills needed for success in the workplace of the future. Almost half of the employees surveyed were not satisfied with their organization’s current learning and development offerings, and 43 percent said they were willing to move to another company if they felt their digital skills were stagnating.

The data suggests that companies’ development priorities are misaligned with their own future talent needs. Our learning and development research has shown that companies are often too focused on short-term skills gaps when creating development programs. In this case, digital skills may be the long-term blind spot.

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Slack and Facebook Workplace Launch New Features as Workplace Announces 30K User Businesses

Slack and Facebook Workplace Launch New Features as Workplace Announces 30K User Businesses

Facebook has made a number of rapid-fire improvements to its enterprise offering Workplace since launching the bold play for the workplace productivity market last year: Earlier this year, it introduced a free tier of the service and added a collection of new features like file-sharing integrations to keep up with the rapidly developing standards of collaboration platforms as Facebook vies for dominance in the market against Slack, Microsoft, Google, Atlassian, and a growing number of new competitors.

This week, the social media giant released another package of new Workplace features, including a desktop app that allows screen sharing and will soon introduce group video chat. TechCrunch’s Ingrid Lunden checks the specs of the latest update:

Previously, the video features in Workplace were limited to live video broadcasts and one-to-one video conversations. Alongside the new apps and features, Facebook is also updating the overall design of Workplace to simplify the interface and make it consistent across Android, iOS, desktop and web[.]

Workplace has positioned itself as the collaboration platform for everyone in your organization — not just those who are so-called “knowledge workers” who are at desks most of the day. The idea is that everyone, from executive to barista to warehouse assistant, will find Workplace easy to use because, well, it looks and feels a lot like the hugely popular Facebook. However, the new desktop apps — for both PC and Mac — are a hat tip that there are, in fact, a lot of those desk-sitters using Workplace, too.

Facebook had said the app was a response to user requests, but Lunden argues that these new features are also aimed at boosting user engagement, as that metric is critical for Workplace’s business model:

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Big Tech Lures AI Talent With Outsized Salaries

Big Tech Lures AI Talent With Outsized Salaries

At the New York Times on Sunday, Cade Metz, whose work on the AI talent market we’ve looked at before, wrote about what may be the key factor allowing tech giants to corner the market for AI talent—namely, salaries far above what smaller and less wealthy competitors could afford to pay:

Typical A.I. specialists, including both Ph.D.s fresh out of school and people with less education and just a few years of experience, can be paid from $300,000 to $500,000 a year or more in salary and company stock, according to nine people who work for major tech companies or have entertained job offers from them. All of them requested anonymity because they did not want to damage their professional prospects.

Well-known names in the A.I. field have received compensation in salary and shares in a company’s stock that total single- or double-digit millions over a four- or five-year period. And at some point they renew or negotiate a new contract, much like a professional athlete. … Salaries are spiraling so fast that some joke the tech industry needs a National Football League-style salary cap on A.I. specialists. “That would make things easier,” said Christopher Fernandez, one of Microsoft’s hiring managers. “A lot easier.”

The concentration of AI expertise in the hands of a few large, rich companies is a matter of concern because it runs the risk of shutting out not only smaller enterprises and startups, but also universities from hiring these cutting-edge technologists. If the academy is unable to compete for PhD holders in this field, that runs the risk of creating a shortage of professors to teach the next generation of AI specialists and conduct research in the public interest. Recognizing the transformative power of this technology, some tech leaders have talked about making AI innovations open and accessible rather than proprietary, while some AI experts are turning down industry jobs to work at universities or research institutes, but half-million-dollar salaries are hard to resist.

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ReimagineHR: Recruiting Executives Still Uneasy About Tech Applications

ReimagineHR: Recruiting Executives Still Uneasy About Tech Applications

In a peer benchmarking session at the ReimagineHR conference CEB, now Gartner, is hosting in Washington, DC, recruiting leaders representing hundreds of organizations expressed uncertainty about the role of technology in their function and its impact on their work.

Previous conversations we have had with recruiting leaders have suggested that technology investments were mostly focused on the front end of the process—sourcing and branding—but participants in Wednesday afternoon’s session said managing the talent pool was actually the top priority for technology investment, with sourcing second and branding lagging far behind. Those who chose talent pool management were primarily high-volume recruiters looking for a more efficient way to sift through thousands of applicants per open position.

When asked if they thought applying text analysis to job descriptions would have a demonstrable effect on hiring for diversity, recruiting leaders were skeptical. Only 14 percent believed it could, while the rest said no or that they were unsure. Textio and SAP are working on text analytics solutions to aid diversity efforts, but this uncertainty from their potential customer base underscores the idea that technology is not a cure-all for diversity.

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