Video: Why Employees’ Perceptions of Pay Equity Matter

In our recent pay equity research at CEB, now Gartner, one of our key findings was that employees tend to perceive pay inequities based on gender or race as larger than they really are. These perceptions have a direct and significant negative effect on retention and morale, creating a bottom-line reason for organizations to communicate more openly with their employees about pay gaps that exist within their workforce, what they mean, and what the organization is doing to address them. Our Total Rewards team has produced the above video to help employers better understand the importance of pay equity perceptions.

Our own Ania Krasniewska also highlighted this subject in her recent overview of the five things most companies don’t realize about pay equity:

[T]he gender pay gap and pay inequality are often conflated in the public consciousness, and most employees don’t have the same nuanced understanding of group-to-group and role-to-role gaps as compensation leaders do. That means they often think pay gaps are larger than they really are or that they exist in places they don’t. In our research, we’ve found that employees tend to overestimate these role-to-role gaps and that women tend to overestimate them more than men.

Read more

New Inclusion Campaigns Focus on Educating Allies

New Inclusion Campaigns Focus on Educating Allies

Earlier this month, Kyle O’Brien at the Drum took a look at HP’s latest and inclusion marketing campaign, a series of videos called “Reinvent Mindsets,” which takes aim at unconscious bias by highlighting the subtler forms of discrimination black Americans and women are subject to in the workplace. The first video in the series addressed the fact that black Americans are three times more likely than their white colleagues to be rejected for a role they are qualified for, while the second touches on the sexist expectations women must navigate in job interviews:

In its latest video in the Reinvent Mindsets series, HP tackles gender bias through a powerful video pairing fathers and daughters talking about the tough process of job interviews. ‘Dads & Daughters’ pairs fathers and daughters having one-on-one discussions. The dads were asked to read generic interview tips for women that had been found online and talk about them with their daughters.

Tips included “Don’t wear too much perfume”, “Don’t be aggressive trying to negotiate your salary”, “Don’t look too hot”, “Don’t be chatty” and “Just found out you’re pregnant? Best to keep it to yourself for now”. The daughters, unsurprisingly, look exasperated. But as the dads read they spark a discussion about bias, strength and individuality.

Another company with a new D&I initiative worth noting is Accenture, whose latest video, “Inclusion starts with ‘I’,” features real employees sharing their feelings about unfair ways they have been treated at work. Fortune’s Ellen McGirt applauds the initiative, which was developed through a series of workshops and hammers home the point that inclusion means creating an environment in which everyone feels valued and respected:

Read more