Survey: Remote Work Becoming More Common, but Company Policies Lag Behind

Survey: Remote Work Becoming More Common, but Company Policies Lag Behind

The second annual Future Workforce Report from the freelance hiring platform Upwork finds that even though most US managers expect more of their team members to work remotely in the coming years, most also say their organization lacks a specific policy on remote work:

Sixty-four percent of hiring managers feel that their company has the resources and processes in place to support a remote workforce, yet the majority (57 percent) lack a remote work policy. …

Over half (55%) of hiring managers agree that remote work has become more commonplace as compared to three years ago. Five times as many hiring managers expect more of their team to work remotely in the next ten years than expect less. In the next ten years, hiring managers predict that 38 percent of their full-time, permanent employees will work predominantly remotely.

Among those companies that do have remote work policies, many respondents indicated that these policies are evolving to become more flexible and inclusive, which is helping them attract talent in a tight labor market:

Nearly half (45%) of hiring managers said their company’s work-from-home policy has changed in the past five years, with 60 percent saying it has become more lenient and inclusive. This increased inclusivity is making it easier for companies to find the talent they need. Over half (52%) of hiring managers that work at companies with work-from-home policies believe hiring has become easier in the past year.

Read more

LinkedIn Enters the Freelancer Platform Market

LinkedIn Enters the Freelancer Platform Market

Two months after inking an acquisition deal with Microsoft that is widely expected to move it in a new direction, LinkedIn has launched an online marketplace for freelancers to compete with platforms like Upwork and Thumbtack, Sarah Kessler reports at Fast Company:

Launched on Wednesday, “LinkedIn ProFinder” asks employers to submit contract jobs in categories such as design, writing, or financial services and promises to send them up to five free quotes from LinkedIn users in response. …

LinkedIn’s version does not yet have a set business model. “We want to continue learning and iterating to ensure we get it right before instituting paywalls,” a LinkedIn spokesperson told Fast Company. Currently professionals can submit up to 10 proposals for free. After the 10th job application, they’ll need to subscribe to LinkedIn’s Business Plus subscription, which costs $60 per month. Eventually, the spokesperson said, LinkedIn might host payments between employers and freelancers, which would mean it could take a commission on each transaction.

With this move, LinkedIn is stepping into a growing and rapidly evolving market of online recruiting platforms. Some other recent entrants include HourlyNerd, a platform for management consultants that calls itself “Uber for MBAs,” and Scaled, a UK-based startup that aims to disrupt how businesses hire shift workers. Legacy employers are also, with organizations like PricewaterhouseCoopers launching in-house platforms to contract out freelance work.

Gig Economy Platforms for Legacy Companies

Gig Economy Platforms for Legacy Companies

PricewaterhouseCoopers recently launched an online marketplace where freelancers can apply to work for the accounting firm on a project basis, Claire Zillman reports at Fortune:

If PwC deems them qualified for a specific project, the freelancers will be invited to bid on the job by submitting their per-hour rate. Then it will be up to PwC to decide what workers get the gig. Miles Everson, leader of PwC US Advisory, said the platform will allow the firm to tap into the growing segment of the workforce that’s independent. “We’ve seen a big increase in the freelance workforce,” he told Fortune on Monday. Part of that trend is driven by demographics—mainly people retiring. But there are other people who are voluntarily “choosing to move around,” Everson said. “They’re building micro-entrepreneur careers by moving from one set of projects and experiences to another.” …

PwC’s new platform called “Talent Exchange” is only available in the United States and is primarily geared toward the firm’s consulting business. It launched February 8 and as of Friday had garnered 4,650 registrants. Everson said PwC is still determining what percentage of applicants actually come away with a job, but he projected that freelancers will eventually make up 10% of the firm’s consulting workforce in the U.S., which now stands at 13,000.

As HRE’s Andrew McIlvaine notes, PwC’s Talent Exchange is an in-house example of a service many vendors, including Upwork and LinkedIn, have begun offering to connect freelance talent with potential clients, including large organizations:

Read more