Former Tinder Employees Launch Mobile-First Professional Networking App

Former Tinder Employees Launch Mobile-First Professional Networking App

A group led by former Tinder CTO Ryan Ogle has launched Ripple, a mobile competitor to LinkedIn. Rather than try to match up with LinkedIn’s growing list of features, however, the new app is focused solely on networking and includes a number of interesting features.

For one, Ripple hopes to gain from its mobile capability is the opportunity to take advantage of proximity. Users will be able to find potential contacts nearby and also start networking events using the app. This new offering, which originated from an internal hackathon at Tinder and eventually spun off into its own company, will be able to draw information from your LinkedIn, Twitter, and Facebook profiles and also—perhaps controversially—allow you to take pictures of people using your smartphone and find their profiles.

Ripple will also employ the swipe function popularized by its dating app cousin, but Ogle insists that Tinder is a lot more than swiping and plans for Ripple to include more detailed profile information such as job history, education, etc. without going to a new screen.

“People have misconstrued why Tinder succeeded,” Ogle tells TechCrunch’s Sarah Perez. “Certainly, the swipe was interesting, engaging and fun. But the reasons why Tinder succeeded were far deeper than that. We thought a lot about the psychology of networking and the problems… what holds people back and prevents them from achieving what they want to achieve.”

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Blind: Coming Soon to an Employee’s Desktop Near You

Blind: Coming Soon to an Employee’s Desktop Near You

Blind, the anonymous workplace community app that bills itself as a “real-time Glassdoor” and has taken the tech sector by storm, is releasing a desktop version of its native mobile app this month, Joel Cheesman reported last week, citing an app update. The application, which claims hundreds of thousands of verified users including over 30,000 Microsoft employees and 16,000 at Amazon, allows users to chat, share information, and gossip anonymously with other people at their company, about their company.

Blind started out in South Korea in 2014 and came to Silicon Valley in 2015, where it has ignited a controversy over what anonymous forums mean for both employees and employers: Like Glassdoor, Blind is a place where employees can share information (not necessarily accurate) and express opinions (not necessarily positive) without what they say getting back to their employer, but also without that employer having much opportunity to present their side of the story. It has also raised questions about data privacy and security, though Blind assures users that it takes pains to encrypt and discard user data, so that nothing they write there can ever be traced back to them through digital fingerprints, and so that no personal data will be exposed in the event of a breach.

In any case, with the desktop move, Cheesman predicts Blind “will certainly introduce the app to a lot of people who hadn’t heard of it before.” That’s obviously the idea, anyway, as a fast-growing company like Blind naturally wants to expand its user base. Cheesman is skeptical, however, that Blind’s anonymous forum will survive:

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Facebook Testing CV Feature in Further Push Toward Recruiting

Facebook Testing CV Feature in Further Push Toward Recruiting

Since Facebook launched its new job listings feature earlier this year, the social media giant has made what looks like a play for LinkedIn’s share of the online job search and recruiting market. Since then, Facebook has integrated job listings into its Marketplace platform, revealed that it is testing location targeting for advertising, and has been playing around with a mentor/mentee matchmaking feature. The Next Web spots what could be the company’s next move in its evolution into a job search tool, reporting that Facebook is testing a résumé feature that lets users add more detail about their work experience to their profiles:

The new addition expands on the standard ‘Work and education’ section, but won’t publicly display all information about your credentials. The dedicated resume field lets you conveniently list your professional and educational background in more detail. It also allows selecting the precise dates when you started and left each undertaking that appears there. …

Interestingly, the screenshots indicate the detailed information will not readily show up on your public profile. This could mean that Facebook is considering making the hidden resume details available exclusively to job hunters and talent seekers. … As with any other test feat, there is no telling whether and when the functionality will make its way to all users.

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You May Soon Be Able to Find a Mentor on Facebook

You May Soon Be Able to Find a Mentor on Facebook

Since launching its new job listings feature earlier this year, Facebook has made a series of moves to position itself as a direct competitor to LinkedIn. Even if it has little chance of overtaking the Microsoft-owned professional networking site in the job search market anytime soon, the social media giant clearly sees growth potential in this field. Just in the past month, Facebook has integrated job listings into its Marketplace platform and revealed that it is testing location targeting for advertising, including potentially job ads.

Facebook’s latest move in the professional networking space entails testing a way to connect users who are looking for mentors or mentees, TechCrunch’s Ingrid Lunden reports:

Our first look at the mentoring service came from a source, who had found a couple of references to mentoring in Facebook’s code. They appear to be fragments from a set of guidelines for mentors, introducing them to the program[.] Later, we found that another person spotted an internal run of how the feature would look on the mobile app. It appears that the app matches a mentee’s interests up with those of the mentor’s, and by way of introduction, gives them a list of points they have in common, including friends, education, geographic location and — most importantly — profession[.]

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BumbleBizz Aims to Make Professional Matchmaking Safer for Women

BumbleBizz Aims to Make Professional Matchmaking Safer for Women

In the past two years, as competition in the online recruiting market has heated up, social media companies of all stripes have gotten into the hiring and professional networking game, including online dating platforms. Last April, the dating site eHarmony launched a job search website based on the company’s matchmaking algorithms, as part of a broader trend of these platforms expanding their business into targeted advertising, branding, and other ways to leverage their value as social networks.

Whitney Wolfe, the 28-year-old founder and CEO of Bumble, launched her company in 2014 as a response to the problematic gender dynamics of the online dating space, where women in particular are often subject to sexual harassment, abuse, and unwanted attention. The premise of Bumble is that users of both sexes can swipe through profiles and express interest in those users they would like to meet, but only women are allowed to initiate a conversation, and anyone using the network for abuse or harassment is promptly blocked and banned.

Fast Company‘s Karen Valby takes a look at Bumble’s newest offering, BumbleBizz, which will debut in October and offer a similarly women-centered approach to professional networking:

The concept of Bizz is a relatively easy sell for current users: Set up a discrete profile for networking, all while continuing under the principle that anyone can match, but women alone can initiate contact. Unlike many other professional and social networks, which exist to connect you to people you know, Bizz’s mission is to introduce you to new contacts, with added protections like verified profiles. One key to Bizz’s success will be drawing a new demographic of users into Bumble’s ecosystem. The challenge, says Bumble’s director of marketing, Chelsea Cain Maclin, is convincing “someone like my mother, who is married and has three kids and now wants to get back into healthcare work, that we have something to offer her.” …

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Facebook Integrates Job Listings with Marketplace Feature

Facebook Integrates Job Listings with Marketplace Feature

Earlier this year, Facebook launched a new feature allowing businesses in the US and Canada to post job listings, which prospective employees can see on the organization’s Facebook page or through the social media site’s new jobs bookmark. The feature allows organizations to post job listings directly to their Facebook page, which will also appear in the news feeds of users who “like” the organization.

Now, the site is linking up its Jobs feature with its Marketplace tab for mobile users in the US, Canada, and Mexico, according to ERE‘s recruiting tech watchdog Joel Cheesman:

Till this move, job postings were relegated to only being found if a user actually went to a company Page where the job was posted. Users might also see a job posting if they followed a Page or saw an advertisement promoting a job opening. This latest move puts job postings within Marketplace, which represents a significant increase in eyeballs. Mobile numbers in North America are a tough to nail down, but looking at Facebook’s advertising manager, eyeballing traffic at around 100 million monthly active users isn’t a stretch.

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LinkedIn Introduces ‘Pipeline Builder’ Feature to Help Organizations Source Talent

LinkedIn Introduces ‘Pipeline Builder’ Feature to Help Organizations Source Talent

LinkedIn on Tuesday announced the rollout of a new feature called “Pipeline Builder” that “identifies, engages, and generates interest from professionals on the LinkedIn network, through advanced ad targeting and a personalized landing page experience.” The feature is intended to help employers identify candidates who were not being captured through other sourcing techniques; in its pilot program, LinkedIn says, 84 percent of the candidate pool Pipeline Builder generated “had not previously applied to a job at the company, despite being qualified for the role and having shown interest in the company.” The feature is particularly geared toward organizations that need to hire a large number of employees in a short period of time:

Imagine that you’re looking to hire 10 engineers in a short amount of time. Here’s how Pipeline Builder works in this case:

  • You set the exact criteria for your target talent pool — you can filter by title, years of experience, schools, companies and location, to name a few. [As seen in image above, those] LinkedIn members are then targeted with ads in their feed on both desktop and mobile, as well as with a new banner on your Company Page.

  • Once members click on these ads, they’re taken to a personalized landing page experience that greets them by name and allows them to engage with your opportunity through custom rich media (including video) and tailored content.

  • Prospects can then click the “I’m Interested” button on the landing page to share their LinkedIn profile and additional contact info, without going through the hassle of a lengthy application.

At ERE, recruiting tech expert Joel Cheesman characterizes Pipeline Builder as “another solid offering from LinkedIn” and as a competitive move in response to efforts by other tech giants to make waves in the recruiting space, such as Facebook’s job listing feature and Google’s machine-learning-enhanced job search functionality, as well as its applicant tracking system Google Hire:

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