Facebook, Employers Hit With Gender Discrimination Suit Over Job Ad Targeting

Facebook, Employers Hit With Gender Discrimination Suit Over Job Ad Targeting

A group of job seekers, backed by the Communications Workers of America and the American Civil Liberties Union, filed charges with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission on Tuesday against Facebook and nine employers who they say used the social media site’s demographic targeting features to discriminate against female candidates in job ads, the New York Times reports:

The employers appear to have used Facebook’s targeting technology to exclude women from the users who received their advertisements, which highlighted openings for jobs like truck driver and window installer. The charges were filed on behalf of any women who searched for a job on Facebook during roughly the past year. …

The lawyers involved in the case said they discovered the targeting by supervising a group of workers who performed job searches through their Facebook accounts and clicked on a variety of employment ads. For each ad, the job seekers opened a standard Facebook disclosure explaining why they received it. The disclosure for the problematic ads said the users received them because they were men, often between a certain age and in a certain location.

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More Companies Identified in Lawsuit Over Age Targeting in Facebook Job Ads

More Companies Identified in Lawsuit Over Age Targeting in Facebook Job Ads

Last December, an investigative report by ProPublica and the New York Times, along with a lawsuit filed the same day by the Communications Workers of America, alleged that dozens of companies were discriminating against older job candidates by targeting their job ads on Facebook to users within specific age demographics, in what the plaintiffs in the suit say is a violation of the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967. The companies mentioned in the report included Verizon, UPS, and State Farm, while the lawsuit initially named Amazon, T-Mobile, and Cox Media Group specifically, along with “hundreds of other large employers and employment agencies,” identified in the lawsuit as a defendant class.

In an amended complaint filed last week, the union named other individual companies it said were engaging in this allegedly discriminatory practice, including Capital One, Enterprise Rent-a-Car, Ikea, and Facebook itself, along with several others. These companies are not named defendants in the suit, but are given as examples of large employers that have advertised jobs on Facebook and specified that these ads only be shown to users within a certain age range. The CWA also filed a complaint against Facebook with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in January, and says it has filed similar complaints against dozens of employers, Bloomberg’s Josh Eidelson reported on Tuesday.

Facebook and other companies have defended the practice of age-targeting social media ads, comparing it to running an ad in a magazine targeted toward younger or older people. Critics, however, reject this comparison, arguing that a person over the age of 45 can buy a copy of Teen Vogue if they wish, but cannot see a Facebook ad targeted specifically to users younger than them.

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Facebook Testing CV Feature in Further Push Toward Recruiting

Facebook Testing CV Feature in Further Push Toward Recruiting

Since Facebook launched its new job listings feature earlier this year, the social media giant has made what looks like a play for LinkedIn’s share of the online job search and recruiting market. Since then, Facebook has integrated job listings into its Marketplace platform, revealed that it is testing location targeting for advertising, and has been playing around with a mentor/mentee matchmaking feature. The Next Web spots what could be the company’s next move in its evolution into a job search tool, reporting that Facebook is testing a résumé feature that lets users add more detail about their work experience to their profiles:

The new addition expands on the standard ‘Work and education’ section, but won’t publicly display all information about your credentials. The dedicated resume field lets you conveniently list your professional and educational background in more detail. It also allows selecting the precise dates when you started and left each undertaking that appears there. …

Interestingly, the screenshots indicate the detailed information will not readily show up on your public profile. This could mean that Facebook is considering making the hidden resume details available exclusively to job hunters and talent seekers. … As with any other test feat, there is no telling whether and when the functionality will make its way to all users.

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Facebook Partners With ZipRecruiter to Expand Job Search Capability

Facebook Partners With ZipRecruiter to Expand Job Search Capability

In its latest move in the online recruiting space, Facebook announced last week that it was integrating with the job advertisement aggregator ZipRecruiter to increase the number of job listings available on its platform, TechCrunch’s Ingrid Lunden reported

Before now, companies that wanted to use Facebook for recruiting, adding job ads to their Pages, would have had to do this directly through Facebook itself. By partnering with ZipRecruiter and others like it, organizations will now be able to tick a box to broadcast the job add to Facebook among a wider mix of job boards that can be accessed through a one-stop shop — ZipRecruiter, as one example, covers hundreds of these boards. …

The move is interesting because it’s a sign not just of how Facebook is looking for more volume and usage of its jobs feature, but also the realization that it may not be able to achieve this on its own steam, leading to a more friction-free, user-friendly approach.

This is an interesting move for Facebook, as integrating a job listing aggregator allows them to edge further into LinkedIn’s territory and having users seamlessly interact with job opportunities seems like a natural next step to expand the platform. However, I think Facebook’s success as a recruiting platform will depend less on the volume of ads it hosts and more on how much it improves the recruiting experience for candidates.

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How Facebook’s Location Targeting Feature Could Change the Recruiting Game

How Facebook’s Location Targeting Feature Could Change the Recruiting Game

Facebook has been making a big push into the online recruiting space this year, rolling out a new job listings feature for businesses in the US and Canada in February, and now working to integrate that feature with its Marketplace offering. Now, recruiting tech maven Joel Cheesman adds at ERE, Facebook is testing the ability to target users with advertising based on very precise location data, and Cheesman can think of at least three obvious ways recruiters could use this functionality:

1. Targeting customers. People who physically go into your place of business are more likely to love you, and thus more likely to work for you or spread the gospel. If brand loyalists start seeing ads on Facebook about working for the business they already frequent, logic says those are pretty impactful ads.

2. Poaching. Let’s say you’re a healthcare provider in a large metro, and you’d like to get in front of a competitor’s pool of nurses, radiologists, and physicians. Facebook just made it a lot easier. Assuming you’ll be able to target the number of times a person visits a location, you’ll be able to filter out most of the patients, and additional targeting options already available on Facebook will help you filter out the people you don’t care about.

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Facebook Integrates Job Listings with Marketplace Feature

Facebook Integrates Job Listings with Marketplace Feature

Earlier this year, Facebook launched a new feature allowing businesses in the US and Canada to post job listings, which prospective employees can see on the organization’s Facebook page or through the social media site’s new jobs bookmark. The feature allows organizations to post job listings directly to their Facebook page, which will also appear in the news feeds of users who “like” the organization.

Now, the site is linking up its Jobs feature with its Marketplace tab for mobile users in the US, Canada, and Mexico, according to ERE‘s recruiting tech watchdog Joel Cheesman:

Till this move, job postings were relegated to only being found if a user actually went to a company Page where the job was posted. Users might also see a job posting if they followed a Page or saw an advertisement promoting a job opening. This latest move puts job postings within Marketplace, which represents a significant increase in eyeballs. Mobile numbers in North America are a tough to nail down, but looking at Facebook’s advertising manager, eyeballing traffic at around 100 million monthly active users isn’t a stretch.

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Geofencing: A New Way to Target Job Candidates

Geofencing: A New Way to Target Job Candidates

Every recruiter is familiar with the concept of meeting candidates where they are, but new technological solutions are putting a new spin on that idea. Earlier this month, NPR’s Yuki Noguchi reported on how some employers are using geofencing technology to target job advertising to talent in specific geographical areas:

Carol McDaniel has a perennial challenge: Attracting highly specialized acute-care certified neonatal nurse practitioners to come work for Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital in St. Petersburg, Fla. They are “always in short supply, high demand, and [it is a] very, very small group of people,” says McDaniel, the hospital’s recruitment director.

So, about six months ago, McDaniel says, the hospital started using a new recruitment tactic: It buys lists of potential candidates culled from online profiles or educational records. It then uses a technology to set up a wireless fence around key areas where the coveted nurses live or work. When a nurse with the relevant credentials enters a geofenced zone, ads inviting them to apply to All Children’s appear on their phones.

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