IBM Expands Parental Leave to 20 Weeks for New Mothers

IBM Expands Parental Leave to 20 Weeks for New Mothers

IBM has joined the list of tech companies overhauling their parental leave policies to court working mothers in the US. The company’s VP of Employee Benefits, Barbara Brickmeier, announced on Wednesday that the company had updated its parental leave policy, applying retroactively to IBM babies born or adopted after November 2016: New mothers will now have up to 20 weeks of paid leave, rather than 14, and leave for new fathers, partners, and adoptive parents has been doubled from six to 12 weeks.

Parents can take this time off at any time during the first year after the birth or adoption, and IBM will also reimburse up to $20,000 of employees’ adoption of surrogacy expenses. Brickmeier also highlights some other changes the tech giant has made to support parents, especially mothers, in its workforce:

As medical diagnosis has improved, our society has recognized the potential of special needs services for children. Our Special Care for Children Assistance Plan reimburses employees $50,000 towards applicable services for each child with mental, physical or developmental disabilities.

In addition, we continue to adapt our popular family-friendly programs, which include:

  • Our 2015 milk delivery program for nursing moms who travel on business has been expanded to international travel;
  • Childcare center and after-school center discounts across the U.S.;
  • Expanding expectant mother parking to IBM locations across 50 states;
  • Investing in child care centers with guaranteed priority status for IBM families through our Global Work/Life Fund;
  • A range of maternity and mindfulness services;

IBM already scored high on indices of working-mother-friendly employee benefits and corporate environments, and is both following and driving forward an industrywide benefits war to attract and retain working mothers to help fill their talent gaps. It has also developed, in partnership with iRelaunch, a re-entry program for mid-career women who have taken extended career breaks, such as to care for a child or elderly parent.

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4 Things You Might Not Know About Hiring Veterans

4 Things You Might Not Know About Hiring Veterans

The US workforce includes roughly 9.8 million veterans, roughly 32 percent of whom served in the armed forces after 2001. These veterans and their spouses have become a focal point for progressive employers seeking to hire from a diverse and often highly qualified pool of talent that is often underutilized. Thanks in part to these efforts, as well as the work of many organizations dedicated to connecting vets with job opportunities, the number of unemployed veterans in the US has declined substantially over the past four years.

Organizations that make veteran hiring a priority do so not only out of respect for their service and sacrifice, but also because they recognize the value veterans can bring to their organization as employees. Our analysis at CEB, now Gartner, finds that veterans are slightly more productive than non-veterans and have lower turnover, by 2-3 percentage points. In fact, the average veteran employee contributes an additional $7,500 to an organization’s overall performance.

Yet despite the extra value veterans have to offer, many employers still shy away from hiring them due to misconceptions about their characteristics, abilities, and needs. At CEB’s ReimagineHR event in Washington, DC, on Thursday, Chris Ford, founder & CEO of the National Association of Veteran-Serving Organizations (NAVSO), led a panel discussion on strategies for recruiting and retaining veterans with Mark Erwin, Special Assistant to the Secretary at the US Department of Veterans Affairs, Ret. Major General Paulette Risher, Chief Programs Officer at Still Serving Veterans, and Dan Goldenberg, executive director of the Call of Duty Endowment. The panelists shared a number of important and in some cases surprising facts about veterans in the American workforce:

1) Veterans Can Be Hard to Find and Don’t Always Self-Identify

The first thing an organization needs to do if it wants to hire veterans is find them. Veterans can come into the hiring process through three different pipelines: While some may come straight out of the military, Erwin explained that fully half of the 250,000 veterans who transition to civilian life each year use their Post-9/11 GI Bill benefits to attend college, and so will be found through campus recruiting. Countless others, meanwhile, are already in the workforce, but they are not always easy to spot.

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Businesses Expand Benefits to Retain Working Mothers

Businesses Expand Benefits to Retain Working Mothers

As more and more companies recognize the need to keep women in the workforce after they become mothers, the most progressive employers have introduced a range of new benefits to cater specifically to the needs of working parents. Quartz’s Jenny Anderson takes a look at the latest report from Working Mother highlighting the 100 US companies with the best benefits for moms and showing the lengths they are going to in order to retain them:

Cutting-edge companies on this front, including Deloitte, IBM, McKinsey, UBS, and Unilever, have delved into the most painful tradeoffs inherent to hard work: kids in need, household management, and family illness. The response includes help for parents whose kids have autism (88% of Working Mother’s top 100 companies offer this type of support), college coaching for teens (63% of the top 100 offer it), letting new moms phase back into work gradually with full pay (70% offer this), and even homework hotlines, which one-quarter of Working Mother’s top 100 offer. …

Working Mother, which has compiled the list for 32 years, picks its best companies based on 400 questions about a range of factors, including leave policies, workforce representation, benefits, childcare, advancement programs, and flexibility policies. … The most competitive companies go deeper, though, focusing on employees’ needs after parental leave, and how to help them stay. More companies are now willing to say, “‘I will pay more, have less in my bottom line, but I will keep employees,’” says [Subha Barry, senior vice president & managing director of Working Mother Media].

Retention is indeed the name of the game here, as the absence of family-friendly policies is a significant driver of attrition among working mothers.

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Nonprofits Competing with Socially Conscious Corporations for Purpose-Driven Talent

Nonprofits Competing with Socially Conscious Corporations for Purpose-Driven Talent

The 2017 Nonprofit Employment Practices Survey, published recently by Nonprofit HR, shows how the nonprofit sector is being affected by the tight market for talent in the US and the growth of social enterprise organizations as a competitor in that market. Overall, the survey finds, the nonprofit hiring market is robust, with half of the 420 US and Canadian nonprofits it surveyed saying they planned to add staff in 2017. That figure declined by seven percentage points from 2016, however, whereas corporate hiring expanded, which the report attributes “at least in part to the growth of social enterprise and purpose-driven business.” In other words, the candidates who would normally seek out jobs at nonprofits are being attracted instead to socially conscientious for-profit businesses.

As the millennial generation has grown up to become the largest segment of today’s workforce, this generation’s values and interests are significantly influencing the way employers engage candidates and employees. Millennials do have a particularly strong interest in making a difference in the world, with a recent survey finding that 75 percent of US workers between the ages of 18 and 34 expect their employer to take positions on social issues affecting the country. Yet even though millennials may be driving the trend of a purpose-driven workforce, these interests are not unique to them.

Despite facing increasingly stiff competition, most nonprofits are not taking steps to improve their recruiting, talent management, and culture practices, the Nonprofit HR survey shows. 64 percent of organizations said they had no formal recruitment strategy, while the number that said they did has been declining over the past two years. Additionally, 70 percent have no dedicated recruiting budget, 69 percent have not engaged in an employment branding process, 81 percent have no formal retention strategy, and 52 percent do not have a diversity and inclusion strategy.

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Danny Meyer Wants to Change the Culture of the Restaurant Business

Danny Meyer Wants to Change the Culture of the Restaurant Business

Restaurateur Danny Meyer, the founder of Shake Shack and CEO of the Union Square Hospitality Group, is already famous for his employee-centered approach to restaurant management: By eliminating tipping in favor of higher wages and offering restaurant staff benefits like paid parental leave, he has broken the mold in an industry typically associated with high turnover, unpredictable incomes, and little in the way of job security or growth opportunities.

Meyer’s vision, which Aaron Hurst explored in an in-depth profile at Fast Company last week, is much bigger than simply abolishing tips. He’s looking to fundamentally transform the culture of his businesses, in large part by giving employees both a literal stake in the success of the restaurant and a greater sense of ownership toward the business and their careers:

When I asked Meyer how the change has turned out, he says when you make such a sweeping move across your business you have to make sure everyone is listened to, including your customers and your staff, “Our first priority was engaging and educating our own team in this conversation through a series of internal townhalls, so that they could be genuine ambassadors of the change. We started the conversation about “Hospitality Included” with our own people months before we made the news public or implemented it in any of our restaurants.” …

How do you persuade your waiters to forgo a 20% tip on each table they serve? Meyer says they never wanted to hire people who would only have been nice to you if they assessed it out of the four tables in their section, you were the richest or you were the most generous. “I would never want someone on our team who would go through that calculus. To say, “Who should I bring the food out for first?”

Now, the Wall Street Journal reported on Sunday, Meyer is taking his campaign to change beyond his own restaurants and even beyond the restaurant industry, launching a $220 million private equity fund called Enlightened Hospitality Investments LP to back companies that share his values of pursuing growth by taking the best possible care of their employees. Restaurant industry observers say the fund will likely get favorable terms on many of its investments because businesses want to be associated with Meyer’s brand.

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When a Job Is ‘Just a Job,’ Are Employees More Likely to Quit?

When a Job Is ‘Just a Job,’ Are Employees More Likely to Quit?

A new survey from CareerBuilder claims that a 55-percent majority of US employees feel that they have just a job, not a career, and that 38 percent of these workers are likely to change jobs in the second half of 2017:

Almost three in 10 workers (28 percent) tolerate or hate their job. Of those who tolerate or hate their job, some of the top reasons for staying in a current position are the need to pay the bills (74 percent), its proximity to home (41 percent), needing the insurance (35 percent), it pays well (30 percent), or the job market is too tough (27 percent).

This survey picks up on something that we at CEB (now Gartner) have seen in our latest Global Talent Monitor data: Most US employees across a number of industries cite their future career opportunities as a leading reason for leaving their organization. Given this fact, it is easy to assume that this is a reflection that there is simply a lack of career opportunities available to employees, leading to disengagement and attrition. However, our data shows that this is not the case. We find that 12 percent of US employees we surveyed were actively dissatisfied with future career opportunities at their organizations and only 31 percent reported they were satisfied. The remaining 58 percent are somewhere in the middle—that is, neither satisfied nor dissatisfied, but rather neutral or ambivalent.

This finding suggests that while future career opportunities are a key part of employees seeking a new job, the claim that lack of future career opportunities is driving attrition at organizations is overstated. When we look at how an employee’s satisfaction with future career opportunities at their current organization affected their engagement levels, we do not see nearly as strong as a connection as CareerBuilder reports in their survey.

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Auto Dealers Struggle to Attract, Retain More Women in Sales

Auto Dealers Struggle to Attract, Retain More Women in Sales

According to CDK Global, a provider of software and marketing solutions to the automotive retail industry, women make or influence most vehicle purchases in the US, but showroom employees at auto dealerships remain overwhelmingly male, and dealers are beginning to notice that the lack of women on their sales teams is hurting profits, Claire Ballentine and Jeff Green report at Bloomberg:

Women make up about 19 percent of U.S. dealership employees and most of those are support staff, according to the latest estimates from the National Automobile Dealers Association. The annual turnover rate for the few women who do sell cars is 88 percent, CDK says, meaning would-be buyers interested in negotiating with a female dealer may find themselves fresh out of luck. …

The lack of women on car dealers’ sales floors starts with lackluster hiring efforts. More than 60 percent of female dealership employees surveyed by CDK in May said their companies weren’t doing anything to help recruit more women. When women do get recruited, many say they find dealerships still aren’t a welcoming place. More than half who CDK surveyed have been in their current position for six or more years, suggesting upward mobility is an obstacle. And 57 percent reported experiencing gender bias, like having to endure boorish, sexist banter.

Dealers are taking a number of tacks when it comes to making these sales roles more attractive to women, such as introducing more flexible schedules and compensation strategies that lean more on salary as opposed to commission. As in other industries, auto saleswomen are more likely to succeed at dealerships with women managers, where they have access to mentorship and where management is more attentive to their concerns.

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