Kimberly-Clark Fishes for Innovation With ‘Original Thinkers’ Campaign

Kimberly-Clark Fishes for Innovation With ‘Original Thinkers’ Campaign

ERE editor Todd Raphael takes note of the personal care product manufacturer’s new recruitment marketing campaign, which advertises the company as “on a quest for Original Thinkers to solve problems and create solutions”:

Frans Mahieu, global marketing director, people strategy, at Kimberly-Clark, says that a little over a year ago the 144-year-old company realized “the market for top talent is becoming tighter and more competitive.” It asked itself what it could do better to get top talent, particularly to its large Neenah, Wisconsin, location. The end result is a new Kimberly-Clark website. It features a variety of “original thinker” employees: one developed a bladder-support product. A couple others changed the way Huggies are marketed. Two more developed vitamin-infused facial wipes.

Part of the site involves an “original thinkers” quiz. You’re asked, for example, how you’d run a local recycling program. Create a slogan? Gather opinions from neighbors? Or, would you question why this is a priority in the first place, over safety and security? The quiz then tells you what sort of original thinker you are, such as a “dreamer,” or “nonconformist,” or “inventor.”

Read more

Kimberly-Clark Is Transparent About What Performance Management Means

Kimberly-Clark Is Transparent About What Performance Management Means

Until recently, personal care products manufacturer Kimberly-Clark had a longstanding reputation for lifetime employment and job security. “That’s over,” the Wall Street Journal’s Lauren Weber writes:

One of the company’s goals now is “managing out dead wood,” aided by performance-management software that helps track and evaluate salaried workers’ progress and quickly expose laggards. Turnover is now about twice as high it was a decade ago, with approximately 10% of U.S. employees leaving annually, voluntarily or not, the company said. Armed with personalized goals for employees and large quantities of data, Kimberly-Clark said it expects employees to keep improving—or else. “People can’t duck and hide in the same way they could in the past,” said [Scott Boston, vice president of human resources].

It has been a steep climb for a company that once resisted conflict and fostered a paternalistic culture that inspired devotion from its workers. …

Read more