Google Testing Workplace Analytics Tool for G Suite Users

Google Testing Workplace Analytics Tool for G Suite Users

Google has developed a new feature for its G Suite of enterprise software that will enable managers to track whether and how employees are using various G Suite apps such as Gmail and Google Docs, the tech giant revealed this week. The tool, called “Work Insights,” is now in beta after being previewed with a small set of business customers, and will allow administrators to “gain visibility into which teams are working together and how they’re collaborating” and “review trends around file-sharing, document co-editing, and meetings to help foster connections, strengthen collaboration and reduce silos.”

To protect employee privacy, Google added, Work Insights only produces aggregated data analytics for teams of ten people or more, so admins will not be able to monitor individual employees’ use of G Suite apps, but will be able to see, for example, how many employees in a given business unit are using Google Hangouts.

The move looks like part of Google’s efforts to make G Suite more competitive against Microsoft’s enterprise technology collection, Office 365, CNBC’s Jillian D’Onfro noted in reporting the news. G Suite had 4 million paying customers as of this past February, whereas Microsoft counts 135 million active monthly commercial users of Office 365, which made its own Workplace Analytics feature generally available in 2017. Workplace Analytics also only uses aggregated and de-identified data to provide insights on a team, not individual, level.

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Google Adds New Search Feature to Help Veterans Find Jobs

Google on Monday introduced a feature in its job search functionality specifically geared toward helping veterans find jobs. Matthew Hudson, a program manager for Google Cloud who previously served in the US Air Force as a civil engineer, announced the news in a blog post:

Starting today, service members can search ‘jobs for veterans’ on Google and then enter their specific military job codes (MOS, AFSC, NEC, etc.) to see relevant civilian jobs that require similar skills to those used in their military roles. We’re also making this capability available to any employer or job board to use on their own property through our Cloud Talent Solution. As of today, service members can enter their military job codes on any career site using Talent Solution, including FedEx Careers, Encompass Health Careers, Siemens Careers, CareerBuilder and Getting Hired.

This is just one of several steps the search giant is taking to support veterans. To help those who start their own businesses, Google will now allow establishments to identify themselves as veteran-owned or led when they pop up on Google Maps or in Google search mobile listings. Additionally, Google.org is giving a $2.5 million grant to the United Service Organizations (USO) to incorporate the Google IT support certificate into their programming. Google first made the certification available outside the company earlier this year through a partnership with Coursera.

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Google Opens Up Its ‘Cloud Talent Solution’

Google Opens Up Its ‘Cloud Talent Solution’

After successfully piloting its AI-enhanced job search technology, Cloud Talent Solution, with select customers including Johnson & Johnson and CareerBuilder, Google made the product publicly available last week, VentureBeat reported:

Cloud Talent Solution, which launched as Cloud Jobs API in 2016, is a development platform for job search workloads that factors in desired commute time, mode of transit, and other preferences in matching employers with job seekers. It also powers automated job alerts and saved search alerts. According to Google, CareerBuilder, which uses Cloud Talent Solution, saw a 15 percent lift in users who view jobs sent through alerts and 41 percent increase in “expression of interest” actions from those users.

Alongside the public launch of Cloud Talent Solution, Google introduced a new feature to the toolset: profile search. It allows staffing agencies and enterprise hiring companies to, using natural phrases like “front-end engineer” or “mid-level manager,” sift quickly through databases of past candidates. Profile search is available today in private beta.

Organizations can try Cloud Talent Solution out for free (pricing kicks in at over 10,000 queries per month) directly through the Google Cloud platform, or request access through one of Google’s talent acquisition technology provider partners.

The public rollout of Cloud Talent Solution is another sign of Google’s extensive investment in AI and machine learning and the rapidly growing application of these technologies to talent acquisition and management. It is just one of several avenues through which Google is moving into the recruiting market.

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Google Expands Job Search Feature to UK

Google Expands Job Search Feature to UK

Google has launched its built-in job search function to the UK, the company announced in a blog post on Monday:

In the U.K., we’re working with organizations from across the job-matching industry to bring you the most comprehensive listing of jobs, like The Guardian Jobs, Reed.co.uk, Haymarket, Gumtree, The Telegraph, Reach plc’s totallylegal, CV-Library and totaljobs.com. This means anyone searching for jobs on Google will see postings from these sites and many others from across the web as soon as they’re posted. To ensure even more jobs are listed over time, we’re publishing open documentation for all jobs providers detailing how to make their job openings discoverable in this new feature.

This launch also builds on the commitment we made last year to help 100,000 people in the U.K. find a job or grow in their career by 2020. We’re doing that through our Google Digital Garage program, which gives anyone free training in digital skills and products to help grow their career, business or confidence. So far we’ve helped tens of thousands of people find their next job through free training at four city-center hubs and with partners across the U.K.

The search giant launched the job search feature in the US a little over a year ago. Google does not host job listings itself, but rather partners with job listing sites like Facebook, LinkedIn, and Monster, as well as country-level partners like the organizations mentioned above (The leading job search site, Indeed, has declined to participate). The feature was introduced to India and Canada this May.

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Google Updates Hire With New AI Tools

Google Updates Hire With New AI Tools

In the latest release of its applicant tracking system, Google Hire, the tech giant has added three new features that use Google AI to reduce repetitive and time-consuming tasks, Senior Project Manager Berit Hoffmann wrote in a blog post announcing the update on Tuesday. From measuring user activity, Hoffmann noted, Google determined that Hire has already cut down the amount of time recruiters spend on common tasks like reviewing applications or scheduling interviews by up to 84 percent; the new features are intended to simplify the process even further. The new features include:

  • Interview scheduling: When a user wants to schedule an interview with a candidate, Hire now uses AI to automatically suggest interviewers and time slots. The AI will also alert the recruiter if an interviewer cancels at the last minute and recommend a replacement. “This means hiring teams can invest time in preparing for interviews and building relationships with candidates instead of scheduling rooms and checking calendars,” Hoffmann writes.
  • Résumé highlighting: To reduce the amount of time recruiters spend scanning candidates’ résumés for key terms, Hire will now automatically analyze the terms in a job description or search query and automatically highlight them on résumés. Google introduced this feature after observing that users were frequently using “Ctrl+F” to search for the right skills—an easily automated process.
  • One-click candidate phone calls: The final feature is designed to make it easier for recruiters to reach out to candidates by phone with a click-to-call functionality. Users can call a candidate simply by clicking on their phone number, while the system will automatically log calls to keep track of which candidates have already been contacted by whom.

Google Hire was launched last July as part of the company’s G Suite of enterprise software offerings, but only for US businesses with under 1,000 employees: a deliberate decision to help level the playing field for small and mid-sized businesses that lack the dedicated recruiting resources and bespoke applicant tracking systems of their larger peers. In April, Google Hire expanded into the sourcing realm with a new “candidate discovery” feature that allows users to more easily keep track of past candidates who might be good fits for newly open positions, along with more advanced search capability to provide more relevant results based on what recruiters are actually looking for.

ERE’s Joel Cheesman sees these new AI enhancements as further evidence of the massive edge large tech companies like Google, Facebook, and Microsoft enjoy in the new era of online recruiting: “Deep integration into technologies that so many people already use daily, such as Gmail and Google Calendar, must drive traditional recruiting technology solutions crazy. Build all the Chrome extensions you want, but nothing’s ever going to be better than the stuff Google has baked itself.”

 

Google’s Latest Diversity Report Features Data on Attrition, Intersectionality

Google’s Latest Diversity Report Features Data on Attrition, Intersectionality

Google’s 2017 diversity report, released last week, expands on the information included in previous reports to cover the retention and attrition of underrepresented talent, as well as an intersectional analysis of race and gender at Google. Overall diversity figures were little changed from last year’s report and showed limited progress since 2014, when Google first began making this data public. Men make up 69.1 percent of the tech giant’s workforce, while its racial makeup is 53.1 percent white, 36.3 percent Asian, 2.5 percent black, 3.6 percent Hispanic or Latinx, and 4.2 percent multiracial. In 2014, the Googler community was 61.3 percent white, 30 percent Asian, 1.9 percent black, 2.9 percent Hispanic/Latinx, and 3.6 percent multiracial.

The company has made some progress in improving the gender balance of its leadership over the past four years, with its the percentage of women in leadership globally rising from 20.8 to 25.5 percent. Google’s US leadership is 66.9 percent white, 26.3 percent Asian, 2 percent black, 1.8 percent Latinx, 0.4 percent Native American, and 2.7 percent of more than one race. Black and Latinx representation in leadership have improved slightly since 2014, while the report highlights that 5.4 percent of new leadership hires in 2017 were black.

The attrition data included in this report touches on an issue that tech companies struggling with diversity and inclusion have discovered to be of critical importance: not just recruiting diverse candidates but also retaining those employees for the long term. Based on an index of US attrition, Google’s report shows that attrition rates are highest among black and Latinx employees, at 127 and 115 compared to an overall index of 100. “Black Googler attrition rates, while improving in recent years, have offset some of our hiring gains,” Google acknowledges, “which has led to smaller increases in representation than we would have seen otherwise.” On a global index, attrition was slightly higher for men than for women, however, at 103 compared to 94.

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Alphabet Shareholders Vote Down Proposal to Tie Executive Pay to Diversity

Alphabet Shareholders Vote Down Proposal to Tie Executive Pay to Diversity

Investors in Alphabet Inc., the parent company of Google, voted down all proposed resolutions at on Wednesday’s shareholder meeting, including one that would have made the compensation of senior executives partly dependent on the company making progress toward specific diversity and inclusion goals. The proposal was opposed by Alphabet management, Reuters reported on Wednesday, which sank the resolution as insiders have effective voting control of the company. Google co-founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin hold supervoting shares in Alphabet that enable them to defeat any shareholder resolution they don’t approve of. Google insists that its existing commitments to diversity are sufficient:

Eileen Naughton, who leads Google’s HR operations, said the company remains committed to an internal goal to reach “market supply” representation of women and minorities by 2020, which could help bring hiring in line with the diversity of the candidate pool.

Another resolution aimed at getting Google to provide investors more information about its efforts to moderate user-generated content on the platforms it owns, including YouTube, was also voted down on Wednesday.

The proposal related to diversity was put forward by the activist investment fund Zevin Asset Management and supported by a group of Google employees who have expressed concern about how committed the company really is to being an inclusive environment for everyone who works there. One of those employees, engineer Irene Knapp, addressed Wednesday’s shareholder meeting with a statement that stressed the urgency of addressing ongoing problems in Google’s culture:

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