ReimagineHR: Empowering Girls to Close the Tech Skills Gap

ReimagineHR: Empowering Girls to Close the Tech Skills Gap

Across a variety of industries, the demand for talent with digital skills continues to outstrip the supply. In recent years, many companies have realized that one way to fill this skills gap is to address the significant gender imbalance in roles like software engineering, where men outnumber women three-to-one in the US and by even larger margins in other countries like the UK and China.

This hasn’t always been the case; women were the first programmers in the early days of computing, before coding was seen as a prestigious and lucrative profession. Yet the real shift toward programming being such a male-dominated profession is even more recent, Girls Who Code founder Reshma Saujani pointed out in a keynote address at Gartner’s ReimagineHR event in London on Wednesday: In 1995, women made up almost 40 percent of the computing workforce in the US, whereas today, they make up less than 25 percent. And at a time when there are roughly 500,000 unfilled positions in computing in the US and as many as 700,000 in the UK, Saujani argued, the issue isn’t a question of gender parity for its own sake: companies need women in tech just as much as women deserve the opportunity to do these jobs.

So why are so few women taking jobs in computing? For one thing, the tech industry has developed a reputation as an unwelcoming work environment for women: Sexism and sexual harassment scandals have emerged at several major tech companies in the past two years, while women in tech say they are often pressured to cut short the leave they take when they start families, even as tech companies continue to offer world-class parental leave policies. To that end, bringing back women who left the workforce to raise children or care for aging relatives is one way companies are looking to close their tech talent gaps.

Yet a more fundamental obstacle, Saujani explained, comes much earlier in women’s lives.

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How Accenture Hires Women in Tech Roles, and Keeps Them

How Accenture Hires Women in Tech Roles, and Keeps Them

In a tight market for tech talent, many companies are looking for ways to attract more women to software engineering and other digital roles, including mid-career women who dropped out of the workforce to raise families. Despite these initiatives, a recent study by Accenture and Girls Who Code predicted that the ratio of women to men in computing jobs would likely decline in the coming decade if nothing is done to make STEM education and technology careers more appealing to women:

Not doing enough to encourage more women to work in computing hurts the US economy in general. While computing jobs are growing three times as fast as overall job creation, according to the report, computer scientists are in short supply. In 2015 there were 500,000 open computing jobs in the US, but in 2014, there were less than 40,000 new computer science graduates.

Few are women. The report finds the share of women computer science majors in the US dropped from 34% in 1984 to 18% in 2016.

Accenture has been doing some interesting work in the field of diversity and inclusion; it’s one of several tech employers using a diversity referral program to recruit more candidates from underrepresented demographics. It’s also taking an innovative approach to the inclusion of women. As Accenture CHRO Ellyn Shook tells Workforce‘s Sarah Fister Gale, hiring is just half the battle, as more than half of women in tech leave their jobs mid-career:

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