CareerBuilder Launches New Mobile App with AI and AR features

CareerBuilder Launches New Mobile App with AI and AR features

The job search website CareerBuilder has rolled out a new mobile app that uses artificial intelligence and augmented reality to help job seekers apply and employers find candidates more quickly and easily, VentureBeat reported last week:

The mobile app has some attention-grabbing features. It can build your resume, apply to jobs on your behalf, and show augmented reality views of job openings at the businesses you walk by. It also helps you develop the skills needed for a better-paying job.

And for [employers], the mobile app shows the real-time supply and demand trends for talent you need. It instantly builds your job descriptions, automatically matches your job openings to candidates who are more likely to respond, and runs campaigns to engage them.

CareerBuilder’s mobile app is the latest in a series of new technological innovations search engines and job boards have unveiled in the past year to simplify and streamline the job search process and to provide prospective applicants with additional information about organizations and roles. Google’s built-in job search function was launched in the US last year and has since expanded to India, Canada, and the UK. The search giant has also developed new tools for recruiters, including an AI-powered candidate discovery feature and its Cloud Talent Solution product, which it made publicly available last month. Facebook has also added a dedicated job search functionality, which it has rolled out in 40 countries. The Japanese HR conglomerate Recruit Holdings, which owns Indeed, made a deal to acquire Glassdoor earlier this year.

Read more

How Facebook’s Location Targeting Feature Could Change the Recruiting Game

How Facebook’s Location Targeting Feature Could Change the Recruiting Game

Facebook has been making a big push into the online recruiting space this year, rolling out a new job listings feature for businesses in the US and Canada in February, and now working to integrate that feature with its Marketplace offering. Now, recruiting tech maven Joel Cheesman adds at ERE, Facebook is testing the ability to target users with advertising based on very precise location data, and Cheesman can think of at least three obvious ways recruiters could use this functionality:

1. Targeting customers. People who physically go into your place of business are more likely to love you, and thus more likely to work for you or spread the gospel. If brand loyalists start seeing ads on Facebook about working for the business they already frequent, logic says those are pretty impactful ads.

2. Poaching. Let’s say you’re a healthcare provider in a large metro, and you’d like to get in front of a competitor’s pool of nurses, radiologists, and physicians. Facebook just made it a lot easier. Assuming you’ll be able to target the number of times a person visits a location, you’ll be able to filter out most of the patients, and additional targeting options already available on Facebook will help you filter out the people you don’t care about.

Read more

Geofencing: A New Way to Target Job Candidates

Geofencing: A New Way to Target Job Candidates

Every recruiter is familiar with the concept of meeting candidates where they are, but new technological solutions are putting a new spin on that idea. Earlier this month, NPR’s Yuki Noguchi reported on how some employers are using geofencing technology to target job advertising to talent in specific geographical areas:

Carol McDaniel has a perennial challenge: Attracting highly specialized acute-care certified neonatal nurse practitioners to come work for Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital in St. Petersburg, Fla. They are “always in short supply, high demand, and [it is a] very, very small group of people,” says McDaniel, the hospital’s recruitment director.

So, about six months ago, McDaniel says, the hospital started using a new recruitment tactic: It buys lists of potential candidates culled from online profiles or educational records. It then uses a technology to set up a wireless fence around key areas where the coveted nurses live or work. When a nurse with the relevant credentials enters a geofenced zone, ads inviting them to apply to All Children’s appear on their phones.

Read more