Beware the Insight Gap as Workplace Monitoring Technologies Advance

Beware the Insight Gap as Workplace Monitoring Technologies Advance

Employee monitoring technologies represent the cutting edge of workplace gadgets, and these technologies are already becoming increasingly common, from sociometric badges to tracking devices at desks to sentiment analysis and even experiments with microchipping employees. Olivia Solon at the Guardian recently explored the next generation of this tech:

How can an employer make sure its remote workers aren’t slacking off? In the case of talent management company Crossover, the answer is to take photos of them every 10 minutes through their webcam. The pictures are taken by Crossover’s productivity tool, WorkSmart, and combine with screenshots of their workstations along with other data —including app use and keystrokes—to come up with a “focus score” and an “intensity score” that can be used to assess the value of freelancers.

Today’s workplace surveillance software is a digital panopticon that began with email and phone monitoring but now includes keeping track of web-browsing patterns, text messages, screenshots, keystrokes, social media posts, private messaging apps like WhatsApp and even face-to-face interactions with co-workers. …

Read more

Salesforce Releases its Online Learning Platform to Public

Salesforce Releases its Online Learning Platform to Public

Salesforce, the San Francisco cloud computing company known for its widely adopted customer relationship management software, is going public with its internal online learning platform. Conceived in 2014 and launched internally in 2016, the Trailhead program has allowed numerous employees at Salesforce to develop tangible digital skills and make stark career shifts. In a recent profile by Elizabeth Woyke at the MIT Technology Review, one employee shared how he moved from recruiting to engineering after getting certified in two programming languages through the self-guided, interactive platform:

[Greg] Wasowski’s chances of making such a transition seemed unlikely—until he began spending several hours a week (in the office and on nights and weekends) on Salesforce’s online learning platform, Trailhead. Within a year, he learned two programming languages, earned certification as a Salesforce application developer, and got a job configuring Salesforce software for customers.

The occasion for this profile was Salesforce’s announcement that it will soon release a version of the platform called myTrailhead, which will allow clients to customize it to train their own employees in the specific skills they need. Trailhead, which uses micro-learning, gamification, and a system of points and virtual badges to make its short, consumable training programs engaging and effective, already contains a range of tutorials geared toward Salesforce users, including on how to master, administer, and program for the Salesforce software itself.

In addition to allowing the tech giant’s own 26,000 employees to upskill for career shifts, the platform has also allowed them to get up to speed on technology changes after coming back from leave, thus mitigating the career risks of having a child or taking other extended career breaks due to family obligations or illness. Woyke also interviews a mother at Salesforce who used the system that way:

Read more

Creating a Culture That Performs: Strategies for the Digital Environment

Creating a Culture That Performs: Strategies for the Digital Environment

It is not news that digitalization is forcing organizations to change faster than ever, and that organizational cultures need to equip employees to keep up with the pace of change. In fact, the average organization spends $2,212 per employee per year on culture management, and 82 percent of HR business partners say culture is very important to accomplishing their organizations’ strategies. To address these issues, a group of 57 innovative HRBPs, HR generalists, and other strategic HR professionals gathered with CEB, now Gartner, in New York on November 2 to discuss how to use best practices in culture management to arm their organizations for the digital age.

Our latest research on culture looks at the traditional strategies organizations use to manage organizational culture, what works well, and how organizations can shift their approaches to get cultures that drive business performance. This means throwing out the traditional people-focused playbook on culture management in favor of our research-backed, process-focused strategy. CEB Corporate Leadership Council members can see more insights from our culture study in the latest issue of CHRO Quarterly magazine.

Thursday’s meeting was a fantastic opportunity to learn how different organizations are enacting the key teachings of our culture research, through steps such as:

  • Engaging employees to gather unfiltered feedback.
  • Teaching employees to navigate culture barriers.
  • Redesigning processes to support the culture.

Here are some of the ideas HR practitioners shared and discussed in our New York gathering last week:

Moving From Annual to Daily Culture Measurement

One organization shared that they moved from measuring culture once a year to asking employees daily culture questions as they logged into their workstations. The results are available to managers in real time as long as four people on their teams participate on a given day. Leaders then have the autonomy to decide how they will use the daily feedback, but based on our research, they will now consider empowering employees to be the ones who take action.

Read more

ReimagineHR: 6 Shifts in the Digital Age and Their Implications for HR

ReimagineHR: 6 Shifts in the Digital Age and Their Implications for HR

At our ReimagineHR summit in London on Thursday, CEB (now Gartner) Principal Executive Advisor Clare Moncrieff led a session on creating a common vision of digitalization for the business and HR. After examining hundreds of trends, our research councils serving chief HR officers and chief information officers have identified six deep shifts in the business environment that will result from digitalization. These shifts should act as the framework for heads of HR to:

  • Ensure talent conversations with the line are grounded in business context
  • Identify the current talent implications of these shifts, project future implications, and partner with the line and C-suite peers to prioritize and respond to each
  • Improve their teams’ business acumen (to underscore the importance of this, 58 percent of HR business partners indicated in one of our surveys that building business acumen was their top development goal in 2017)

(The case studies we link to below are available exclusively to CEB Corporate Leadership Council members)

1) Demand Grows More Personal

As customers seek personalized products that align with their preferences and values as individuals (rather than as segments), companies will rely on digital channels and digital innovations in logistics and customer service to achieve personalization at scale. Customers will continue to expect lower-effort, nonintrusive service.

This could, for example, affect how HR functions look for new talent. Attraction of critical talent now requires differentiated, customized branding and career coaching. Candidates will demand a more effortless, personalized application experience. AT&T approached this shift by creating a more personalized “Experience Weekend” to show the innovation of its brand to campus candidates and make top talent more likely to accept job offers.

Read more