Deliveroo Returns to the Spotlight in UK Gig Economy Debate

Deliveroo Returns to the Spotlight in UK Gig Economy Debate

Deliveroo, an Uber-like platform that connects restaurants with delivery workers, is one of several UK companies whose employment practices have been the subjects of public scrutiny and litigation over the past two years as the country wrestle with the contradictions between its existing labor laws and the rise of the “gig economy.” Deliveroo was sued last year by the Independent Workers Union of Great Britain (IWGB), which argued that delivery couriers working through its platform were not self-employed independent contractors as the company contended. While plaintiffs in other gig economy classification suits have succeeded in the British court system, Deliveroo prevailed last November, when the Central Arbitration Committee found that its delivery workers were indeed self-employed, because they had a contractual right to allocate a substitute to do the work for them.

The IWGB appealed to the High Court of Justice, however, from which the union secured a ruling last week that it could pursue a partial judicial review of the CAC’s decision as a human rights issue, TechCrunch’s Natasha Lomas reported on Thursday:

[T]he judge only gave permission for a judicial review on “limited grounds”, relating to whether certain categories of self-employed individuals should have the ability to unionize. “We have been given permission to argue that Deliveroo is breaching the human rights of our members. This is no longer an employment rights matter, this is a human rights matter,” a union rep said outside court after the ruling. …

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UK Lawmakers Push Gig Economy Workers’ Rights, Deliveroo Wins Classification Ruling

UK Lawmakers Push Gig Economy Workers’ Rights, Deliveroo Wins Classification Ruling

The Work and Pensions and Business Committees in the UK Parliament have unveiled a bill meant to close what its supporters call loopholes in current law that let employers misclassify employees as self-employed as a means of saving labor costs and evading their legal responsibilities to those workers, Sky News reports:

It says personnel should be classed as a “worker by default” to ensure access to basic rights such as sick pay because hundreds of thousands are currently being “burdened” by risks associated with flexible working. …

Labour’s Frank Field, who chairs the Work and Pensions Committee, said: “The two committees are today presenting the Prime Minister with an opportunity to fulfil the promise she made on the steps of Downing Street on her first day in office.” He said the draft Bill “would end the mass exploitation of ordinary, hard-working people in the gig economy.”

Opponents of the bill, such as the Confederation of British Industry, say it is shortsightedly cracking down on all forms of flexible employment. As the CBI’s managing director for people and infrastructure Neil Carberry put it to Sky News: “Based on a very limited review of the evidence, the committees have brought forward proposals that close off flexibility for firms to grow and create jobs, when the issues that have been raised can be addressed by more effective enforcement action and more targeted changes to the law.”

Over at Personnel Today, Jo Faragher digs deeper into the bill, which also recommends:

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Deliveroo Updates Contract with Gig Workers Amid Controversy

Deliveroo Updates Contract with Gig Workers Amid Controversy

Deliveroo, a UK technology company that connects restaurants with delivery workers through an Uber-like gig economy platform, has simplified and changed the terms of its agreement with couriers, removing several controversial provisions that had attracted unwelcome attention from lawmakers, Sky News reports:

The company has removed a stipulation in earlier contracts saying that couriers could not challenge their self-employed status at an employment tribunal – a clause that had been described as legally invalid and which people close to Deliveroo said had never been enforced. The document also includes the explicit clarification that couriers can work for other companies at the same time as they undertake work for Deliveroo – a key change that MPs had urged in a critical report on the so-called “gig economy” earlier this year. …

At four pages, the new “contract” is a quarter of the length of those used by Uber, the ride-hailing service, and one-fifth of those used at Amazon, the internet retail behemoth, according to details submitted this year to the Work and Pensions Select Committee.

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