Construction Firms Use Signing Bonuses to Court Experienced Craft Workers

Construction Firms Use Signing Bonuses to Court Experienced Craft Workers

In the latest sign of the tight US labor market giving candidates the upper hand, many construction contractors in the US are now offering cash signing bonuses to skilled craft workers to sweeten the value proposition for joining their team, Jim Parsons reported at the Engineering News-Record this month:

“Signing bonuses are not new, but they are becoming more prevalent,” says Jeff Robinson, president of compensation consulting firm PAS Inc. Unlike the common practice of providing what he calls “mobilization pay” to compensate for relocation costs, contractors now are offering one-time bonuses ranging from a few hundred dollars to upwards of $1,500 per worker.

According to Robinson, a foreman might be offered as much as $3,000, although there may be an expectation that the person will bring other workers along to join the employer’s workforce. “The advantage of a bonus is that it’s a one-time payment that doesn’t affect base pay,” he says, adding that the incentives usually include a 60- to 90-day employment requirement before they can be collected.

The 2017 survey of workforce shortages by the Associated General Contractors of America reported that nearly a quarter of contractors used bonuses for craft personnel because of difficulty filling positions. The trend appears particularly strong in areas where labor demand is extremely high.

Construction is often thought of as a low-skill occupation where one’s qualifications depend more on strength and stamina than knowledge and experience, but in fact it employs a range of skills, while contractors, like most employers, prefer to hire experienced workers if they can, especially for delicate construction tasks that require high levels of skill and craftsmanship. Construction workers are in high demand as commercial and residential building is booming in many parts of the US, and so these workers are becoming harder to find and more expensive to hire.

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Home Depot to Donate $50M to Train Construction Workers

Home Depot to Donate $50M to Train Construction Workers

The Home Depot, the US’s largest home improvement retailer, announced last Thursday that it would donate $50 million to a decade-long project to train 20,000 Americans, including veterans, returning military service members, high school students, and disadvantaged youth, as construction workers, USA Today reported. The donation is part of the company’s corporate social responsibility efforts, but there’s also something in it for Home Depot:

Sales at the nation’s largest home-improvement retailer are dampened if contractors and partners can’t find enough workers to undertake projects. Sales to plumbers and other tradespeople comprise 40% of the company’s revenue, [Home Depot CEO Craig] Menear says. The initiative, he says, also builds on the company’s donation of $250 million through 2020 to provide housing to veterans. Soldiers and veterans will make up about 15,000 of the 20,000 construction workers turned out by the training program.

They could make a noticeable dent in a big problem. There were 158,000 job openings in construction in December, up from 140,000 a year earlier. Eighty-four percent of contractors surveyed by the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB) and Wells Fargo in December cited availability of workers and cost as their most significant problems last year, along with rising materials prices.

The announcement comes at a time when many large US employers are taking high-profile steps toward developing the workforce of the future. Lowe’s, the main competitor to Home Depot, recently announced a partnership with Guild Education to help its employees complete training and apprenticeship programs for skilled trades such as carpentry, plumbing, and appliance repair—fields in which the labor market is expected to face a gap of 500,000 workers by 2026.

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Women Ironworkers to Get Six Months of Paid Pre-Delivery Maternity Leave

Women Ironworkers to Get Six Months of Paid Pre-Delivery Maternity Leave

Although women make up a small fraction of its membership, the ironworkers union has secured for them one of the most generous leave policies for pregnant women in the US, BuzzFeed’s Cora Lewis reported on Monday. The International Association of Bridge, Structural, Ornamental and Reinforcing Iron Workers, which represents about 130,000 construction tradespeople in the US and Canada, announced that members of the union who become pregnant will be entitled to six months of paid maternity leave to be taken prior to delivery, on top of six to eight weeks of postpartum leave:

“The challenges of physical work associated with the ironworking trade create unique health challenges that can jeopardize a pregnancy,” the union said in a statement announcing the benefit, noting that paid maternity leave “is virtually unheard of in the building trades.” The numbers put maternity leave for iron working women on par with corporate employees at tech companies like Etsy, Adobe, Spotify and Cisco. Netflix and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation are among the only companies that offer workers more paid parental leave, according to data gathered by Care@Work, which specializes in family benefits.

While women account for just 2,100 members of the union, changes in technology, workforce demographics, and attitudes toward gender roles mean that women’s share of the workforce in some traditionally-male fields is growing. As employers in other sectors have discovered, construction firms may find this new maternity benefit less costly than replacing female employees who drop out of the workforce to raise children; research has shown that women are significantly more likely to quit if their employer does not offer family-friendly policies like parental leave and flexibility. Bill Brown, CEO of Ben Hur Construction and co-chair of the Iron Workers labor-management working group, told BuzzFeed that he considered the benefit an investment in retaining women employees:

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Strong February Jobs Report Points to Imminent Fed Rate Hike

Strong February Jobs Report Points to Imminent Fed Rate Hike

The US economy added 235,000 jobs in February, while the unemployment rate fell to 4.7 percent from 4.8 percent the previous month and wages grew 2.8 percent over February 2016, according to the latest report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. The strong jobs report means the Federal Reserve is likely to raise interest rates when its leaders meet next week, the New York Times reports:

The overall economic momentum and optimism was given an extra push by February’s unusually warm weather, with almost a quarter of the jobs — about 58,000 — coming from construction alone. Manufacturing and mining also bounced up. Over the past three months, including revisions announced Friday, monthly job growth has averaged 209,000, while year-over-year wage growth jumped up to 2.8 percent. … At the same time, jobless claims are near a 44-year low, the stock market is surging, and consumer spending is growing, bolstering the case for those who argue the economy is strong enough to withstand a rate increase.

While declining unemployment is good news for the economy, the Times notes that employers are experiencing “acute labor shortages” and having to compete more aggressively for candidates:

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