CareerBuilder Launches New Mobile App with AI and AR features

CareerBuilder Launches New Mobile App with AI and AR features

The job search website CareerBuilder has rolled out a new mobile app that uses artificial intelligence and augmented reality to help job seekers apply and employers find candidates more quickly and easily, VentureBeat reported last week:

The mobile app has some attention-grabbing features. It can build your resume, apply to jobs on your behalf, and show augmented reality views of job openings at the businesses you walk by. It also helps you develop the skills needed for a better-paying job.

And for [employers], the mobile app shows the real-time supply and demand trends for talent you need. It instantly builds your job descriptions, automatically matches your job openings to candidates who are more likely to respond, and runs campaigns to engage them.

CareerBuilder’s mobile app is the latest in a series of new technological innovations search engines and job boards have unveiled in the past year to simplify and streamline the job search process and to provide prospective applicants with additional information about organizations and roles. Google’s built-in job search function was launched in the US last year and has since expanded to India, Canada, and the UK. The search giant has also developed new tools for recruiters, including an AI-powered candidate discovery feature and its Cloud Talent Solution product, which it made publicly available last month. Facebook has also added a dedicated job search functionality, which it has rolled out in 40 countries. The Japanese HR conglomerate Recruit Holdings, which owns Indeed, made a deal to acquire Glassdoor earlier this year.

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New VR Tools Supporting Mental Health in the Workplace

New VR Tools Supporting Mental Health in the Workplace

Psious, a virtual reality and augmented reality technology company, originally designed its products to help therapists combat anxiety disorders in patients via immersion therapy. For example, as Helen Lock of the Guardian reports, for patients with a crippling fear of insects, the therapist could expose them to their fears using VR without having to find a bunch of bugs in real life. The company has now expanded its offering to help businesses promote mental health. The vision is that instead of venting angrily around the water cooler or seething internally, there are always-on methods to support employees with depression or anger and provide an outlet to direct their feelings in a healthy way.

The technology can be used to manage a variety of maladies, including stress, ADHD, and fear of public speaking, according to the Psious website. But they aren’t the only ones: CleVR offers a range of VR systems that treat phobias through exposure therapy, while Guided Meditation VR can transport employees from their cubicle to a calm, quiet field, where they’ll be walked through breathing and meditation exercises. Some of these solutions are also suitable for treating PTSD, which can be helpful for veterans or victims of traumatic evens such as sexual assault.

Back in July, NewPathVR launched a portal called RE:NEW, which directs users to a catalogue of wellness applications. Charles Singletary at Upload highlights Google’s Happinss, the “rhythmic casual game” Thumper, and Fearless, another exposure therapy offering, among the different apps available.

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David Rowan at ReimagineHR: ‘Every Kind of Business Is Now a Data Business’

David Rowan at ReimagineHR: ‘Every Kind of Business Is Now a Data Business’

“Technology doesn’t happen in isolation,” David Rowan, Editor-at-large of Wired UK, said at the opening of his keynote on Thursday at the CEB’s ReimagineHR event in London. Rather, Rowan continued, technological advancements create new norms of behavior that affect society and business in far-reaching ways. In today’s world of rapid and accelerating technological change, there is an unprecedented need for business leaders to understand not only new technologies, but also what they do to human behavior.

At the same time that technology is upending the business models and work processes of practically all industries and institutions, it is also changing the way organizations relate to their people. “You need to rethink how your people connect to the network,” Rowan said, meaning not what device they use to connect to the internet, but how they communicate, collaborate, and access information in a digital environment. Today, he asserted, “every kind of business is now a data business”: The cost of data-gathering technologies is falling exponentially and the most important innovations in business today involve figuring out ways to derive value from an ever-growing number of data sources.

Our digitally transformed economy is also producing a new type of organization. That organization, Rowan explained, is distributed, platform-based, and mission-driven. The rigid, top-down, narrowly focused organizational designs of the past are going the way of the rotary phone in a new business paradigm that rewards fast decision-making and constant innovation; Rowan pointed to several examples of CEOs who were actively trying to delegate as many of their responsibilities as possible, aiming to maximize agility by decentralizing and democratizing their companies.

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Microsoft Adding AI to Its HoloLens Headset, Eyeing Workplace Use

Microsoft Adding AI to Its HoloLens Headset, Eyeing Workplace Use

On Sunday, Microsoft released plans for its second-generation HoloLens headset, announcing that the next design of the augmented-reality glasses will incorporate a powerful AI coprocessor. That AI will allow the device to independently analyze sensory data, including what a user sees and hears, without needing to send that data off to the cloud. This will save processing time, making the device faster and more powerful while still preserving the user’s mobility. (For a deeper look at this type of device-native AI technology, read this Bloomberg piece.)

Microsoft’s news also came just a few days after Google’s announcement of a new Glass Enterprise offering. Lisa Eadicicco goes over the differences between the devices for Time:

While the basic concepts behind HoloLens and Google Glass overlap, in execution they couldn’t be less alike. Google Glass is meant to be physically insubstantial like a pair of literal glasses, only noticeable when someone needs it for a specific task. It displays a small virtual screen above the wearer’s eye, which can be glanced at without disrupting other visual tasks. The new version is even friendlier, able to clip onto existing eyeglasses and rendering the technology more accessible for those who need prescription glasses or protective eyewear in their jobs (though it must remain in wireless range of a smartphone to work properly).

HoloLens, by contrast, is much more immersive, since it can display larger graphics that fall within the wearer’s field of view. And unlike Glass, it’s also a functionally holistic device, unconstrained by reliance on smartphone or virtual-reality-style computer tethers to operate. All of HoloLens’s necessary computing components are baked into the headset.

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Google Glass Has Been Resurrected as an Enterprise Tool

Google Glass Has Been Resurrected as an Enterprise Tool

Google Glass, originally developed from a passion project of company cofounder Sergey Brin, was supposed to unlock the next frontier in digital connectivity. While the smartphone has made technology and information omnipresent in our lives, Glass promised to remove the cumbersome barrier of a handheld device and allow for hands-free computing using voice and optical commands. Apps would seamlessly integrate with reality and life would never be the same. But that grandiose vision fell infamously short, as Glass failed to take off as a mass consumer product and the company stopped offering the product in 2015. Development went on in semi-secret, however, and the product has now found a second life as a business solution, which Alphabet, Google’s parent company, is calling Glass Enterprise Edition. In a fascinating profile of the surprisingly resurgent product, Wired‘s Steven Levy catches us up on recent events:

For about two years, Glass EE has been quietly in use in dozens of workplaces, slipping under the radar of gadget bloggers, analysts, and self-appointed futurists. Yes, the population of those using the vaunted consumer version of Glass has dwindled, tired of being driven out of lounges by cocktail-fork-wielding patrons fearing unwelcome YouTube cameos. Meanwhile, Alphabet has been selling hundreds of units of EE, an improved version of the product that originally shipped in a so-called Explorer Edition in 2013. Companies testing EE—including giants like GE, Boeing, DHL, and Volkswagen—have measured huge gains in productivity and noticeable improvements in quality. What started as pilot projects are now morphing into plans for widespread adoption in these corporations.

The new version has also undergone design advancements and now has more processing power, networking capability, and battery life, but that’s the least interesting part of the product’s evolution.

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