Online Recruiting Market Set to Heat Up in 2019 as Key Players Expand

Online Recruiting Market Set to Heat Up in 2019 as Key Players Expand

The marketplace of online recruiting platforms has become increasingly competitive over the past few years, as both big tech companies and startups alike have sought to establish themselves as the platform of choice for both candidates and employers. This week brought news that three of the most-watched competitors in this field are growing, adding new features, or expanding their geographical reach.

LinkedIn announced on Tuesday that it was moving all of its core talent solutions — Jobs, Recruiter, and Pipeline Builder — onto one platform, which it calls the intelligent hiring experience. This consolidation will enable recruiters to “to see all their candidates … in one unified pipeline,” no matter which of these three tools they came from, John Jersin, VP of Product Management at LinkedIn Talent Solutions, explained in a blog post on Tuesday. The company is also “releasing more than 15 new product enhancements for LinkedIn Recruiter and Jobs over the next few quarters,” Jersin added.

In addition to the single pipeline, LinkedIn’s new features include new AI capabilities, which will enable its tools “to talk to one another and leverage machine learning to simplify the hiring process”:

The more you interact with candidates within a project, the more our tools learn about what you like — and don’t like — and then we can surface better candidates for your open role. Based on the applicants, leads, and search results you interact with, the intelligent hiring experience automatically builds a list of recommended candidates for you to consider reaching out to.

The platform is also adding a shared messaging system that will show all candidate communications in one place, a slide-in profile view to more easily look at candidate profiles in the middle of a search, and a feature called “Closing the Loop,” which makes it easier for employers to send rejection messages to applicants, either individually or in bulk. This functionality is meant to address the lack of communication that adversely affects candidate experience and can discourage rejected candidates from applying to other jobs at the same organization for which they might be more qualified. LinkedIn’s mobile app is also getting a call-to-action feature that will enable anyone at an organization to quickly let their LinkedIn network know about a job opening there.

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Google Hire Expands into Sourcing with ‘Candidate Discovery’ Feature

Google Hire Expands into Sourcing with ‘Candidate Discovery’ Feature

Google Hire, the search giant’s recruiting and applicant tracking application, has been updated with a new feature called candidate discovery that is designed to help hiring managers more easily keep track of past candidates who might be good fits for newly open positions, Google announced on its blog last Wednesday. According to the company, the new feature enables managers to:

  • Find qualified candidates immediately upon opening a job. The first step in filling a role should be checking who you already know that fits the job criteria. Candidate discovery creates a prioritized list of past candidates based on how their profile matches to the title, job description and location.
  • Use a search capability that understands what they are looking for. Candidate discovery understands the intent of what recruiters and hiring managers are looking for. It takes a search phrase like “sales manager Bay Area” and immediately understands the skills and experiences relevant to that job title, as well as which cities are part of the Bay Area. That means the search results will include candidates with sales management skills even if their past job titles are not an exact keyword match.
  • Easily search by previous interactions with candidates. Hire lets recruiters search and filter based on the previous interactions with the candidate, such as the type of interview feedback they received or whether you extended them an offer before. Candidates with positive feedback will rank higher in search results than those without, and candidates who received an offer in the past but declined it will rank higher than those who were previously rejected.

The feature is now available in beta to all Google Hire users, a pool currently limited to small and mid-sized US employers using its G Suite of enterprise software products. Matt Charney took a more detailed technical look at the product for Recruiting Daily, noting that “traditional search engines are notoriously bad at searching for individual people and profiles,” which may be why it’s taken Google so long to expand into this space. Now that it has, however, it’s a pretty big deal:

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Survey: Candidates Prefer Recruiting with a Human Touch

Survey: Candidates Prefer Recruiting with a Human Touch

A study published recently by the Dutch HR consultancy Randstad found that a whopping 82 percent of job seekers found heavily automated recruiting processes frustrating, especially if they never hear back from employers about the status of their online applications. SHRM’s Aliah Wright highlights the report’s key findings:

  • 95 percent said technology should be used to assist the recruiting experience, not replace it.
  • 87 percent said technology has made looking for a job more impersonal.
  • 82 percent said the ideal interaction with a company is one where innovative technologies are used behind the scenes and come second to personal, human interaction. …

Too much technology with too few recruiters has hurt the process, said Dave Marko, managing director, On-Demand Analytics Solutions and Information Management for Acumen Solutions in Washington, D.C. Increasing automation without increasing staff creates an imbalance “that forces people to be less personable.” Every touch point that an organization has with candidates is significant, he said. “The goal is to increase candidates. But with all the technology, there’s not enough [recruiters] to make that human connection.”

These findings jibe with another candidate survey conducted a year ago by the American Staffing Association, a staffing industry lobbying group, which found that over three-quarters of respondents preferred some human interaction in their job search.

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Google Launches Google Hire for Smaller US Companies Using G Suite

Google Launches Google Hire for Smaller US Companies Using G Suite

Just weeks after launching its highly anticipated machine learning-enhanced job search feature Google for Jobs, the search giant has rolled out Google Hire, a recruiting app, as part of its G Suite of enterprise software offerings, according to an announcement on Google’s company blog:

Hire and G Suite are made to work well together so recruiting team members can focus on their top priorities instead of wasting time copy-pasting across tools. For example, you can:

  • Communicate with candidates in Gmail or Hire and your emails will sync automatically in both.
  • Schedule interviews in Hire with visibility into an interviewer’s schedule from Calendar. Hire also automatically includes important details in Calendar invites, like contact information, the full interview schedule and what questions each interviewer should focus on.
  • Track candidate pipeline in Hire, and then analyze and visualize the data in Sheets. …

Now, all U.S.-based businesses under 1,000 employees that use G Suite can purchase Hire to land the best talent.

We first caught wind of Google Hire in April, when word got out that the company was testing it. A Google executive explains to Mike Prokopeak at Workforce why they decided to only make it available to small businesses:

Businesses of that size have a different set of hiring needs than larger enterprises, said Dmitri Krakovsky, a vice president at Google. “Small businesses don’t have deep pockets,” he said. “We wanted to level the playing field for them.”

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Google Is Working on an Applicant Tracking System

Google Is Working on an Applicant Tracking System

Google is testing a new product called “Google Hire” that will allow employers to post job listings and track and manage applications, Axois reported on Thursday. The applicant tracking system appears to have been developed by Google’s enterprise and cloud services division, led by Diane Greene, whom Google acqui-hired along with her workplace software startup Bebop in 2015. Several tech companies are already using the service, which Joel Cheesman at ERE hears from an anonymous source is pretty neat:

“Google’s launching a whole HR and employment ecosystem,” my source said. “The product suite will include corporate career sites, an ATS, job feeds and ultimately an algorithm that actually helps paid job boards but will disrupt Indeed, big time.” … Companies currently using Google Hire include Medisas, Poynt, DramaFever, SingleHop, CoreOS, Nanz, Touchlab, Calendly, Citizen Inc, Pace Avenue. … Nothing near a Fortune 500 here, but it should just be a matter of time.

The move to launch Google Hire comes on the heels of its Cloud Jobs API product that was introduced in 2016. The release sparked speculation that Google was potentially laying the groundwork to launch a job board. Initial testers included CareerBuilder, Dice and Jibe. Reviews of the API were positive.

It also comes as Google and other Silicon Valley heavyweights are scrambling for pieces of the enterprise software pie. Microsoft finalized its $26 billion acquisition of LinkedIn in December, and Facebook rolled out its own job listing feature in February. The giants of the Internet are also battling to dominate the productivity and collaboration software market: Google recently rolled out a set of new workplace tools as part of its G Suite enterprise offering, and Facebook is now testing a freemium version of its Workplace tool.

When a Job Candidate Says No, It’s OK to Ask Why

When a Job Candidate Says No, It’s OK to Ask Why

At the Harvard Business Review, Ben Dattner suggests that employers interview the candidates who reject their job offers, in order to get a better sense of what is and isn’t working in their recruiting processes:

While academic institutions often gather feedback from students who are accepted but do not matriculate in order to improve student recruitment and retention and to better compete with rival institutions, doing so with job candidates in a systematic and consistent manner is rare in the corporate world. As with other kinds of selling and marketing, you may learn as much, if not more, from the feedback of customers who choose not to buy as you learn from those who do. …

However, the feedback that is most likely to be useful and within the company’s control is also likely to be the most sensitive and difficult for the candidate to feel comfortable sharing. It might be hard for a candidate to openly tell a hiring manager or a human resources business partner that she thought the hiring manager was unfriendly or unfocused, that some interviewers conveyed a low level of enthusiasm about working at the organization, that there were too many interviewers in the mix, or that different interviewers seemed to convey divergent ideas about the company’s strategy and plans, the level of authority or responsibilities in the role, the key challenges of the role, or what would be necessary for success.

Therefore, it’s helpful to collect feedback via a third party such as an external search, consulting or research firm; an internal market research, branding or analytics department that is outside of both the hiring area and human resources; and/or anonymously through web surveys or via email.

There is an additional benefit to such interviews, which is gathering candidate intelligence. That intelligence could inform the design of an organization’s employment value proposition (improving talent attraction) and understanding of a candidate’s job search behavior or professional profile (improving sourcing).

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