Intel Highlights Closed Pay Gaps, Retention Hotline in New Diversity Report

Intel Highlights Closed Pay Gaps, Retention Hotline in New Diversity Report

Intel’s 2016 diversity report touts a number of big and small gains the chip manufacturer has made in diversity and inclusion over the past year, including a diverse hiring ratio of 45.1 percent, improvements in women’s representation, and closing pay gaps both between men and women and between white and underrepresented minority employees. In last year’s report, which showed modest progress in other areas, Intel announced that it had analyzed the compensation of its US employees and found no gender pay gap; this year, the company says it achieved “100 percent pay parity for both women and underrepresented minorities and achieved promotion parity for females and underrepresented minorities as well.”

In a blog post about the report, Intel’s Chief Diversity & Inclusion Officer Danielle Brown highlights some of the diversity initiatives the company launched in the past year, including WarmLine, which she describes as “a service that provides a support channel for U.S. employees to explore different options with a personal advisor before they consider leaving the company.” As critics noted in response to last year’s report, while Intel had done a good job improving the reach of its recruiting efforts and bringing more women and minorities into the company, many of these diverse new hires do not last long at the company. WarmLine, Brown explains to Fast Company’s Lydia Dishman, is a response to the challenge of matching diversity recruiting with diversity retention—an area where Intel admittedly still has work to do:

Brown says that so far, upwards of 1,200 employees have used [the WarmLine] to report such issues as struggling as new staffer or not being given enough responsibilities. Many of these have resulted in pay raises, promotions, transfers to different departments, or finding employees a sponsor or mentor, says Brown.

The WarmLine also created a data set for the company to see where staff was having issues and placed that within the larger context of the company, Brown says. That’s helped create “playbooks” for individual business units so each could see the analysis of where their own efforts to be more diverse and inclusive were succeeding or falling short. “This work is hard,” Brown admits. “But we have to be committed for the long haul.”